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Special Guest: Literary Agent Eric Ruben

I’m trying to not to double-post… but I couldn’t hold this one back…

As you all know, after umming and ahhing over whether to pursue a traditional publishing deal or go it alone, I finally settled on a compromise: I signed with a small press. For me, it gave me the best of both worlds: a little hand-holding, but not quite as big and scary as the full publishing world. I have got to say, if you can make it big in this world, the rewards are great. I’d love to believe I can, but the reality for many of us is that we’re not gonna shine quite that bright. Even so, we can shine… we can publish, we can be read, we can be loved.

And so I’ve published. I have fans now… really. One or two, anyway.

I’m not going to say I don’t ask “what if”… What if I’d aimed for a bigger deal?

And so, I wonder… what would it be like to work with an agent? What doors do they open? What doors do they close?

To help me, and any other writers curious about such things, Eric Ruben agreed to do an interview with me.

Here goes…

Hi Eric, I’d like to start things off by getting to know you…

So, you’re a lawyer, literary agent, talent manager and a stand-up comic? (Who wouldn’t want to work with you? is my question…). What did you want to grow up to be when you were a child?

I remember wanting to be the President, a talk show host, a comedian, talk show host, race car driver, actor, rock star.

You’ve managed to tick a few off that list… Presidency might be just around the corner!

OK. Let’s get down to why I brought you here…

In today’s world, writers have more options than ever before: holding out for a Big-5 deal, approaching small publishers, self-publishing, or serialising their work on a blog. With all these choices, and the chances of acceptance by an agent/big publisher so small, you can see why authors might choose the other channels. In talking to other writers, the biggest disadvantages of working with an agent, and pursuing a big traditional deal, seem to be: sharing a percentage, and the long wait between selling a book and seeing it on bookshelves (vs. clicking “Publish” on Amazon…). What do you feel an agent has to offer in this ever more competitive market?

Read more…Special Guest: Literary Agent Eric Ruben

New Post Title (Hey, I’m savin’ my creativity for my novel. You got a problem with that, punk?)

Right, I was just noticing that I said I’d keep you informed how I went with that Manuscript Contest I entered (and, I would link to where I said that, and should be able to because I just read it … but I closed the post and I can’t remember which one … Lesson, kids? Erm … write … everything … down? Yeah … yeah … that’ll do). So, I thought I should tell you how I went …

Well …

I didn’t get third.

And, I didn’t get second.

Read more…New Post Title (Hey, I’m savin’ my creativity for my novel. You got a problem with that, punk?)