leafy foreground left
leafy foreground right

Special Guest: Literary Agent Eric Ruben

I’m trying to not to double-post… but I couldn’t hold this one back…

As you all know, after umming and ahhing over whether to pursue a traditional publishing deal or go it alone, I finally settled on a compromise: I signed with a small press. For me, it gave me the best of both worlds: a little hand-holding, but not quite as big and scary as the full publishing world. I have got to say, if you can make it big in this world, the rewards are great. I’d love to believe I can, but the reality for many of us is that we’re not gonna shine quite that bright. Even so, we can shine… we can publish, we can be read, we can be loved.

And so I’ve published. I have fans now… really. One or two, anyway.

I’m not going to say I don’t ask “what if”… What if I’d aimed for a bigger deal?

And so, I wonder… what would it be like to work with an agent? What doors do they open? What doors do they close?

To help me, and any other writers curious about such things, Eric Ruben agreed to do an interview with me.

Here goes…

Hi Eric, I’d like to start things off by getting to know you…

So, you’re a lawyer, literary agent, talent manager and a stand-up comic? (Who wouldn’t want to work with you? is my question…). What did you want to grow up to be when you were a child?

I remember wanting to be the President, a talk show host, a comedian, talk show host, race car driver, actor, rock star.

You’ve managed to tick a few off that list… Presidency might be just around the corner!

OK. Let’s get down to why I brought you here…

In today’s world, writers have more options than ever before: holding out for a Big-5 deal, approaching small publishers, self-publishing, or serialising their work on a blog. With all these choices, and the chances of acceptance by an agent/big publisher so small, you can see why authors might choose the other channels. In talking to other writers, the biggest disadvantages of working with an agent, and pursuing a big traditional deal, seem to be: sharing a percentage, and the long wait between selling a book and seeing it on bookshelves (vs. clicking “Publish” on Amazon…). What do you feel an agent has to offer in this ever more competitive market?

Read more…Special Guest: Literary Agent Eric Ruben

Write.

If you want to play this game, you have to be stubborn and push through all your own doubts and just have some silly little part of yourself keep telling you “I can do this”… it’s the only way. I suck. I’m no where near as good a writer as I want to be… but people do seem to like reading HT, if they know it exists… but first, it had to exist… in completed form…

There, I said it…

I feel I have succeeded

Hey yous fellas… and fella-ettes…. is that how it works? I must ponder on that… (perhaps “fellas” is asexual… sure… I’ll take that).

I’ve been quiet.

Basically, I’ve been writing, or working, or mothering, or (heaven forbid) tidying and cleaning… (shudder)

Sometimes I think to myself “My blog is part of my “author platform” (I quote because I totally understand what that means), I should make it interesting so people will want to read my book”…

The thing is, I may be published, but I am an amateur. I have no guru-spec-tac-u-lar to spill over you and imbue you with the magic of “you can do it too” (although, by the way… you can do it too).

I have me. My book exists in digital and paperback formats…

Read more…I feel I have succeeded

Round, round, get around, I get around…

I think I’m getting better at this interview thing

On another note… I was struggling with making progress on WARRIOR’S TOUCH over the past couple of weeks. Then last night, I had a thought about a scene that was OK, but just wasn’t quite doing it for me… Write it from another POV! At the moment, the scene is in Llew’s POV, but I’m going to have a go at Jonas’ later today. As soon as I had that thought, a whole lot of new dialogue came flooding in, and even a whole new scene! I had thought I’d keep WT in Llew’s POV, even though the story is more about Jonas’ issues because, as a reader, I get quite attached to reading through a particular character’s eyes. But I think it’s going to go a little closer to 50/50. There are a couple of Braph POV scenes again, too. And a new POV…

Oh, and I crossed the 60,000 word mark last night. Yeah, na, I’m not 50% through the story…

Doing it for the love of it?

Salmonella Dub – For the Love Of It (not the version I was thinking of, but it will do)

Why do you write?

When I published my post the other day, somewhat jokingly bemoaning my as yet undiscoveredness, I did get a couple of reminders that we should be writing because we love it, not in order to get famous or (heaven forbid) rich.

Well, I just want to take a moment to be honest…

Read more…Doing it for the love of it?

The long hard road from anonymity…

Guess what.

My book was published at the end of January and I’m not famous yet.

I know!

Seriously, though, I’m sure we all know by now that selling books comes down to more than a matter of having a book out there. First and foremost, it has to be a good book. If you would like it to sell well, it also has to find wide appeal (and sign a movie deal). Now, that sort of thing is hard to predict. It’s a matter of giving the world what it wants when it wants it. You can’t guess this based on what’s been selling. By the time you finish your book, the world will very likely have moved on. So we come back to the good old: Write what you want to read and hope. It’s all about hope.

There is one thing that will help your book sell (once you’ve already written a good one): word-of-mouth.

But how do you get it

Read more…The long hard road from anonymity…

Author Interview: Yep, me again…

Sometimes I feel like all I ever do is talk about me, me, me… Perhaps I do. But then, that’s one reason I love doing things like celebrating NZ Music Month – it’s a chance to celebrate other artists! (Wow, I’m starting to include myself in the rank of artists… It still feels weird, but I suppose… sort of… ).

Anywhay, this was the first Question-Reply-Next Question-Reply… style interview I’ve done. It was fun and gave Ana, the interviewer, the chance to react to my answers. I think she did a great job. I’m her first interviewee, and she’s looking out for MORE! So go check her (and me) out HERE!

.

I’m working on a new drawing:

  1. So I can call myself an artist, and
  2. To give myself the chance to zone out now and then – drawing is a whole different art to writing.

And buy my book.

 

The Barren Island Challenge

… What books would you take with you to a barren island.

You can find out which five I’d take if there was a strict limit (take a fully loaded eReader, I say!… or tablet… something that can play music, too)… Um, where was I? Right, yes, see which five I’d take and why HERE.